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Lexington Events

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November Calendar of Events in Lexington

Every November in Lexington, KY is full of color! The foilage on trees change to orange and red. Every now and then some white snow finds its’ way to the ground. You’ll also find UK blue throughout the city as the football season is in full steam, and basketball season beings!  It’s a beautiful time of the year to be in Lexington indeed!

Every day at Willis Music in November is full of color as well!  We just added new guitars and drums! We rearranged those sections so that you’ll see something you’ve never seen before on your next visit. New pianos just arrived! This month also brings about the single best day to purchase a Step-Up Band & Orchestra instrument. Plus the annual Willis Music Warehouse Sale!

The Lexington Experience is unique at Willis Music! Come try a new instrument! Visit with our experts on staff!

Click on the calendar below to see all the colors of our November calendar!

 

November Calendar for Eastgate Willis Music

Eastgate Calendar for November

Eastgate Store Calendar for October

The Eastgate Store Calendar for October

Eastgate Calendar for Upcoming Events

The Eastgate Stores Calendar for October

Monthly Open Jams!

Here at Moeller/Willis Music we love to jam!  We want to hear you jam to and jam with you!  Twice a month we have an open mic/jam.  Come on out and join us!  Singer songwriter?  New band wanting to try out a few new songs?  Come one come all!  

Our open jams are on the 2nd Thursday from 5 to 8pm and 4th Saturday from 12 to 4pm of each month. Hope to see you there.

 

 

Florence August Calendar of Events

Lots of great events for August at Willis Music Florence. 

Our store has had a little remodel done, so we are celebrating by doing a Piano Showroom Remodel sale. It is now band season, and we are stocked up with everything you need. August 14- Sept 1 we will be opening at 10am just for you!

December NKY Band of the Month – Doghouse

Willis Music Florence is proud to have Doghouse as our NKY Band of the Month.

Like them on Facebook for a 10% discount on your purchase.

Doghouse started in 2000, when four Northern Kentucky friends (Chuck Davis, Paul Riesenberg, Tom Schulte and Dick Stewart) started jamming. It became a frequent occurrance and started talk about playing at parties. We needed a bass player and stole the bass player (Ric Thelen) from Mr. Grumpy, a band with deity status in Maysville, KY, which was destined for break-up. The band played a grade school reunion in Nov. 2000 under the name Beer Nuts, without Tom. This was followed with a performance at St. Tim’s in Union, KY with Tom.  

The band had it’s first real gig under the name Doghouse (short for Doghouse Dick and the Instigators) at Southern Lanes in Alexandria, KY on March 31st, 2001. The band played many parties that summer, and started playing some bars on a regular basis. In the summer of 2002, the band parted ways with Tom, to become a full-force four-piece.  

In May of 2006, Paul Riesenberg decided to leave the Northern KY area for sunny Clearwater Florida, and so departed the band. But Paul was nice enough to give us a little notice and to our great fortune, we found Chris Moriconi, who plays great drums and isn’t too bad of a guy either. On 5/25/2006, we had a farewell and hello gig, where Paul played for half the night and then Chris play the second half, with both playing at the same time for a few songs. 

In July of 2010, Chuck Davis decided the rigors of the road, touring with Doghouse was just too much. He left the band but again was nice enough to give us a little notice and we were lucky enough to find Tim Waters, who has some great vocals and plays guitar and keyboards rather well. 

We’re also glad to welcome back Jim ‘Bobby’ Oaks to the pack to take pictures, help with sound and lights, and all the other things that matter.

Members
Dick Stewart – Lead Guitar, Vocals
Ric Thelen – Bass, Vocals
Chris Moriconi – Drums
Tim Waters – Lead Vocals, Guitar
Jim ‘Roadie Bob’ Oaks – Photos, Sound, Lights
 
 Want to be the next Band of the Month? Email denis eb@willismusic.com
 

Open Mic Night – August 17 – Florence

Open Mic Night August 17 Florence

Summer is winding down. School is just around the corner. Kids are singing the blues and parents (some, not all) singing a happy tune! All genres are welcome to join us! Come on out to the Willis Music Open Mic Night – Wednesday, August 17 th from 6-8 PM. It is in the studio/stage area which is immediately to the left as you walk through the door.

School is starting. So it’s band and lesson time. Don’t forget Willis has all your musical needs covered.

Whether it’s a new instrument, new sheet music, or you want to start taking lessons, Willis has what you need!

Come on out, tune up, warm up your vocal cords and picking fingers and we’ll make some music on Wednesday, August 17 th from 6pm to 8pm. See you there!!!

Beyond the Titans – Florence Band of the Month August

beyond

Willis Music Florence is proud to have

Beyond the Titans as our Band of the Month for August!

Beyond the Titans describes themselves as a metal band in Cincinnati, Ohio that incorporates elements of Jazz, Blues, and many other genres into the music. Members include: Talon Gregory-Guitar, Chris Johnson-Guitar, Sean Hensley-Drums, and Ben Jenkins-Bass.

Check them out at: https://www.facebook.com/BeyondtheTitans/ Like their page and recieve a 10% discount on any 1 item!

titan

Want to be the next Band of the Month? Email deniseb@willismusic.com

Florence Band of the Month – Day N Day Out

Willis Music Florence is proud to have the new up and coming band, Day N Day Out, as our June Band of the Month!

Florence Band of the Month - Day N Day Out

Day N Day Out is from Grant County. They are all students at Grant County High School. We think it is amazing to see such talent in these young men. All four of them have a passion for music and it shows when they play. They have been playing Open Mics and Festivals around the area. Check them out at Rock The Ridge on July 2!

Band Members:

Wyatt Newman – Lead Vocals and Guitar

Kessler Fugate – Lead Guitar and Backup Vocals

Josh Caldwell – Bass and Backup Vocals

Caleb Caldwell – Drums

Check them out at www.facebook.com/dayndayoutband Like their Facebook page, and recieve a 10% discount at Willis Music!

Florence Band of the Month - Day N Day Out 2

 

Want to be our next Band of the Month? Email deniseb@willismusic.com or click here for more info!

April Band of the Month Northern Kentucky – IconX

Musicians and vocalists brought together by a passion of music brings IconX to be featured as the April Band of the Month for Willis Music!
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IconX is an Northern Kentucky’s band. They play music that makes them unique to the covers you would hear played. Covers include Boz Scaggs- Lowdown, Taste Of Honey- Boogie Oogie Oogie, Pink Floyd-On The Turning Away, Tears For Fears- Everybody Wants To Rule The World, Carole King- I Feel The Earth Move and many more. They have captivated audiences and grown a great fan base over the past five years because of their sound, great stage performances and excellent variety of music.
Check them out online at:
Like them on Facebook for a discount:
https://m.facebook.com/iconxmusic/
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Want to be the next Band of the Month? Click Here

Cincinnati February Band of the Month

The Fox Collective is an alternative indie rock band from Lebanon, Ohio. The band was formed by musicians who came from different genre bands to collectively fulfill a specific sound. Inspired by bands and things such as Dance Gavin Dance, Circa Survive, Misnomer, Expeditions and nature itself. Currently the band has been together for nearly a year writing, practicing and recording to release their “Naked” EP. The Naked EP will be made to move you in a subtle yet exciting rush with pretty melodies and in your face riffs.

Members!

James Arnold / Vocals
Josh Allen / Guitar
Andy Mitchell / Guitar
Daquon Brice / Bass
Michael / Drums

Now that you have met the band, go check them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, anywhere you can find them online! Come in to Willis at Moeller Music West Chester and show an associate that you “Liked” their music page on Facebook and receive discounts!

The Fox Collective keeps their fans updated with the latest news, music, merchandise, promotions and whatever through various social media accounts. Some accounts are exclusive to certain media.

Facebook.com/collectivefoxes
Twitter.com/collectivefoxes
Instagram.com/thefoxcollectiveband
Tumblr.com/thefoxcollectiveband

February Band of the Month – Jason Owens Band

Willis Music Florence Band of the month is the Jason Owens Band!

 

Jason OwensThe Jason Owens Band offers a high energy show with a mixture of all the Nashville style guitar playing chops, similar to Brad Paisley and Keith Urban. The Jason Owens Band offers an upbeat sound resembling the energy of a Jason Aldean show. This band will keep the crowd rocking all night! There is nothing like this new and up-coming band. The Jason Owens Band performs songs that appeal to the most discriminating music lovers. The Jason Owens Band performs originals, oldies, all the new country hits as well as rock and pop songs. If you love country music and like to have a good time, you cant miss out with this group!
The band is fronted by Jason Owens, the lead vocalist and super picker who has been talked about by Brad Paisley and Justin Moore for his abilities. Jason’s voice is also diverse, he can hit the low notes of a Johnny Cash song as well as hit high notes from groups like the Eagles. Paul Kelley plays bass guitar and keeps the crowd groovin all night. Andrew Gray rocks the drums and keeps the crowd wanting more and more with his showmanship and stellar playing. The newest addition to the group is Justen Jette, who plays guitar and keyboards for the band. Terry Ranck hits the stage improvising on the saxophone. Justen and Paul also add some outstanding harmony vocals to the mix.
These musicians have played all over the country including The Ranch in Anaheim , California , The Kentucky Speedway Sprint Cup Race, The Yakov Smirnoff Theatre in Branson, Missouri, The Academy Of Country Music in Encino, California, The Viper Room in Hollywood, California, Hard Rock Cafe in Nashville, TN, The Country Music Association in Nashville, TN… just to name a few! Their social media presence is gaining notoriety with a staggering 28,000 plus follow count on Twitter and 10,000 plus on Instagram. Katie Walters and Bud Stross from B105, Q102, and 97.3 The Wolf, some of Cincinnati’s premier radio stations, recently shot a promotional video for the band. You can find it on Youtube, search “Behind The Music With Jason Owens”. If you are looking for a high energy group that keeps your crowd going all night` this is the group for you!

Check out more info at:

http://www.jasonowensmusic.com/  https://www.facebook.com/JasonOwensMusic/

or https://twitter.com/jasonowensmusic

Like his facebook page or twitter page and get a 10% discount on any one item. Show you are a fan to your salesperson!

 

Want to be the next band of the month? Contact Denise at deniseb@willismusic.com for details!

 

 

Calendar of Events – February 2016

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Tons of great events going on at Willis Music Florence Superstore this month! Concerts, discounts and more!

Check out our band of the month, Jason Owens Band! Like them on Facebook or Twitter for a discount in the store!

January Cincinnati Band of the Month – Stone Mountain Mafia

Willis at Moeller Music West Chester’s Band of the Month is:  Stone Mountain Mafia

 

 

 

Stone Mountain Mafia is a Southern Fried Rock Band
That mixes the power and energy of Arena Rockers
of old with the country cool soul of bands like the
Allman Brothers, Lynyrd Skynyrd and others to form a very unique Sound that solidifies their reputation as The Premier Southern Rock Band in the Tri state Area.
These guys are the Torch Bearers of real Rock music not beholden to trends or cliches. 4 on the floor ROCK!
Stone Mountain Mafia is…
Brett Brock… Lead Vocals, Guitar.
Jamie Cook… Bass, Backing Vocals.
Chris Lester… Lead / Rhythm Guitar Backing Vocals.
Cecil Delloma … Lead / Rhythm Guitar, Backing Vocals.
Gary Miller… Drums / percussion & backing vocals.

Now that you have met the band, go check them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, anywhere you can find them online! Come in to Willis at Moeller Music West Chester and show an associate that you “Liked” their music page on Facebook and receive discounts!

January Calendar of Events

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January Events

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December Band of the Month – Eden Park Band

band of the month

Willis Music Florence is proud to announce that Eden Park Band is the December Band of the Month!

eden park band logo

Like any of their social media pages listed below, show your salesperson and receive a discount!! This months band is amazing and if you are able to go check them out, I highly recommend it. Their music is played on local stations including our partner, Class X Radio.

Eden Park Band performs Pop, Rock and R&B music from the 60′s-90′s and MORE!

Eden Park Band is a leader in LIVE music for corporate events, casino entertainment, fine dining establishments and music venues.

The bands members collectively appear on over 1 million records world wide, and have shared the live stage with musical greats Kansas, Foreigner, Peter Frampton, The Temptations, Bootsy Collins, Blessid Union of Souls and more. Performing throughout the Greater Cincinnati/Dayton, Ohio area and beyond, Eden Park Band is quickly becoming one of the mid-west’s most sought after bands for live entertainment. The members of Eden Park Band know how crucial each performance is and are focused professionals on and off stage.

Eden Park Band endeavors to further establish themselves as one of the best corporate entertainment bands in the Mid West, USA and around the WORLD.

UPCOMING SHOWS:
Tues Dec 01 – Grandview Tavern(Ft Mitchell, KY) 7pm “Trio”
Sat Dec 05 – Jack Binion’s Steakhouse Horseshoe Casino(Cincinnati) 8:30pm “Full Band”
Fri Dec 11 – View 162 inside Crowne Plaza Hotel (Dayton, OH) 9pm “Unplugged Performance”
Sat Dec 12 – Taqueria Mercado (8th & Walnut Cincinnati) 8pm “Full Band”
Fri Dec 18 – Silverton Cafe’ (Cincinnati) 8pm “Full Band”
Sat Dec 19 – Grandview Tavern (Ft Mitchell, KY) 8:30pm “Full Band”
Tue Dec 22 – Grandview Tavern (Ft Mitchell, KY) 7pm “Trio”
Sat Dec 26 – Jack Binion’s Steakhouse Horseshoe Casino (Cincinnati) 8:30pm
Thu Dec 31 – New Years Eve performance at Taft’s Ale House 15th & Race (Cincinnati) 9pm. By reservation ONLY. Price is $35 standing room and $90/table seat see taftsalehouse.com for details.
eden park band
Want to be our next band of the month? Email deniseb@willismusic.com to request info!
willis music

Cincinnati Willis Music Band of the Month

Moeller/Willis Music Band of the Month

Our store has the privilege of featuring “The Stagger Lee Band” as our band of the month for October!

The Stagger Lee Band was formed April of 1981 when band founder Bobby Joe Mueller named the group after the 1958 hit song made famous by Lloyd Price. For many years they have performed, and still play for plenty of loyal fans. The Stagger Lee Band plays clubs, concerts, and all over the tri-state area. They have also been seen in recording studios making some magic here and there! They are very thankful for their ongoing success in the music business and pride themselves on consistency, hard work and professionalism.

Cammy Award’s “Best Band in Cincinnati” for two years in a row, The Stagger Lee Band continues to bring great music to the people. Now, for a little introduction.
Drum roll please…

Front man, Bobby Joe Mueller plays acoustic guitar, harmonica, and percussion. He sings that smooth soulful style of country music! Don’t be fooled though, he can also belt out a rocker when he wants. An entertainer and a guy who likes to get the crowd involved, ladies and gentleman, Mr. Bobby Joe!

KJ Summerville is a very accomplished guitar player as well as vocalist. He joined Stagger Lee in 1994 and has been a very strong force in Cincinnati’s musical community winning “Best Instrumentalist” for two years in a row according to Cammy Awards.

Steve Falearos joined the band in June of 2013. Steve’s primary instrument is bass guitar. He also owns his very own recording studio in Franklin, OH called “Babblefish Studios.” Babblefish has recorded over one thousand projects including Stagger Lee’s new release “Brotherhood.”

Pro Drummer Mike Tapogna is the man behind the kit. With over 30 years of continuous playing, studying, and recording, Mike is more than qualified for his job. He has shared arena stages with big name artists and played dives with friends. A true musician, Mike continues to do what he does best, play the drums.

Now that you have met the band, go check them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, anywhere you can find them online! Come in to the store and show an associate that you “Liked” their music page on Facebook and receive discounts!

 

Click here for the rules to be the next Band Of The Month!

Want to Be Our Band of the Month?

What is band of the month?

Each month we will randomly pick who our BAND OF THE MONTH will be. We will promote your band for the entire month on our website, Facebook, & Twitter. Do you have merch? Bring it in, and we will proudly display it! Do you have a record of your music? We will play it in our store so that people hear your music! Your entire band and fans will get up to 15% off one entire purchase for that month if they “like” your band on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or any other social media sites!

HOW DO I SIGN UP?

Simply fill out the BAND OF THE MONTH submission form and hand it to a Moeller/Willis Music Rep. We’ll draw the BAND OF THE MONTH the first of every month!

Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument: Trombone

This post is the final installment of our “Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument” series. This series is geared toward informing the young wind player of some basic cleaning, care, and maintenance techniques to keep your instrument in good working order. Today’s lesson: the trombone.

 

The most important element to trombone maintenance is the slide. There are several slide lubricant options, but the important thing to remember is to keep it moving freely. Whenever you are playing, be aware of your surroundings so you don’t accidentally hit your slide on your chair or stand. The smallest dent or bend in the slide can make it not function properly, and this is an issue that needs to be taken to a professional repair person.

Necessary Care Supplies:
Slide lubricant (your teacher may recommend one of the following):
Slide oil
Slide cream and water spray
Formulated product (like Slide-O-Mix)
Slide grease (for tuning slide only)
Bore snake
Mouthpiece brush

Optional Care Supplies:
Polishing cloth

Water Key:
You should CONSTANTLY empty your water key (spit valve). This means every several minutes while you are playing, and especially before you return the trombone to its case. Simply press the water key to hold it open, and blow air through the instrument so moisture will leave through the valve (it might be handy to keep a paper towel to empty your valve onto so you don’t leave a puddle).

Main Slide:
It is extremely important to keep your main slide well lubricated – both for the condition of the instrument, and for ease of playing. Your slide will need to be lubricated FREQUENTLY, probably each time that you play. There are several different options:

  • Slide oil: the most straightforward option, and may be best for beginners. Simply extend your slide, apply slide oil to the inner slide, and move the slide in and out to distribute the oil.
  • Slide cream: slide cream requires water to work properly. Apply slide cream to the inner slide, and spray some clean water (from a spray bottle) to the slide before moving it to distribute. Some musicians like this method as it allows the slide to move very fast, and the cream does not need to be applied as often – only the water spray. The downside to the slide cream is that residue tends to build up on the slide faster than with oil, so you may need to clean your instrument more frequently.
  • Formulated products: there are many other products out there (one of the most popular is called Slide-O-Mix). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on any type of product.

Tuning Slide:
REGULARLY, move the tuning slide on the instrument. This will prevent it from “freezing” (getting stuck). OCCASIONALLY, you should grease your slide to clean it and keep it moving freely. Simply remove the slide (pay attention to which direction it faces so you can put it back correctly), apply a small amount of slide grease to the inner slide, and replace it. Wipe off any excess grease. (Note that this is a different type of grease than the one you use for your main slide)

Cleaning:
OCCASIONALLY (every 6-8 weeks or so), you should clean the inside of your trombone. Mark Flegg has a great article on thoroughly cleaning your trumpet (http://markflegg.com/instruction/how-to-clean-your-trumpet/) that can apply to the trombone as well. The good news is that your entire trombone can be submerged in water! Fill a bathtub with warm (not hot) water (you can also add a small amount of dish soap). Remove the main slide and tuning slide from the trombone and place them in the water. Let them soak for a few minutes, then use your bore snake to clean the insides (insert in one end and push through until you can pull the whole apparatus through the other end). Next submerge the body of the trombone in the water and do the same. Use whatever combination of snake and brushes you need to in order to clean the inside of all of the tubing. Rinse each part of the instrument with clean running water, and allow to air dry. Grease your slides with the appropriate materials, and reassemble.

Use your mouthpiece brush (cone-shaped) to gently clean your mouthpiece AS NEEDED. You can use a mouthpiece sanitizing/cleaning spray, or a small amount of dish soap and warm water. DO NOT put your mouthpiece in the dishwasher.

OCCASIONALLY (once a week or so), you may want to use a dry (untreated) polishing cloth to wipe any dirt and residue from the outside of your trombone. The oils from your fingers can cause the finish to deteriorate if not occasionally wiped off.

Questions?
We hope that this has been informative for our young trombone players. If you have any other questions, we would be happy to answer them at Willis Music. Good luck!

Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument: Saxophone

This post is the third installment of the “Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument” series from Willis Music. This series is geared toward informing the young wind player of some basic cleaning, care, and maintenance techniques to keep your instrument in good working order. Today’s lesson: the saxophone.

 

Like all woodwinds, one of the most important things to remember is that woodwinds and water don’t mix! There is a small disk of a soft material covered by a film or leather under each key (called a pad) that seals the key to the hole when it is closed. This mechanism is necessary for the instrument to work. When the pads get wet (water, rain, breath condensation), they disintegrate and fail to seal the keys. Pads will need to be replaced occasionally, but it is best to avoid needing to do it prematurely. Proper care of your instrument will ensure that it will last longer. The other big element to saxophone care is the reeds, which will have its own section below.

Necessary Care Supplies:
Swab
Cork Grease

Optional/Occasional Care Supplies:
Mouthpiece brush
Key brush
Polishing cloth
Reed Guard
Padguard

Cleaning:
After EVERY USE, you should swab (clean the inside of) your saxophone. The swab should consist of a piece of material (and perhaps a piece of foam or bristle) attached to a long string with a weight on the end. Remove your reed, mouthpiece, and neck. Make sure the swab is unfolded completely, and drop the weight through the bell. Turn and gently shake your saxophone until the weight drops out the other end, and pull the fabric through. Gently shake moisture from the neck (if the swab will fit through the neck, swab it as well).

The other option is a pair of items, often called a “Padsaver” and a “Necksaver.” These are flexible, fuzzy rods that are inserted into the instrument and left there to wick moisture from the pads. These are acceptable as well.

Use your mouthpiece brush (cone-shaped) to gently clean your mouthpiece AS NEEDED. You can use a mouthpiece sanitizing/cleaning spray, or a small amount of dish soap and warm water. DO NOT put your mouthpiece in the dishwasher – it is not made to handle the heat and will warp and be ruined.

OCCASIONALLY (once a week or so), you may want to use a dry (untreated) polishing cloth to wipe any dirt and residue from the outside of your saxophone. Pay special attention to the keys – the oils from your fingers can cause the finish to deteriorate if not occasionally wiped off.

Cork:
The first several times you use your instrument, then EVERY FEW USES after that, you should grease your neck cork. The neck cork is a tube of cork on the next where the mouthpiece is attached. It creates a seal so that air cannot escape when the instrument is assembled. Apply a small amount of cork grease to the neck cork to make the mouthpiece easier to attach, and to condition the cork so it will last longer.

Reeds:
Reeds are one of the most important (and can be one of the most frustrating!) elements of caring for your saxophone. They are both the most fragile part of the instrument, and the part essential for creating a good sound (or any sound at all!). Take extra care when handling reeds and assembling your instrument not to let the tip (thin end) touch anything. The tiniest chip or crack will cause problems with your reeds. Proper storage when not playing is also essential to keep the reed from breaking or warping. NEVER leave your reed on your mouthpiece when you put your instrument away, it should always be removed and stored in its own case. Most reeds are sold in individual plastic protector sleeves – these are effective in preventing breaks, but can still allow the reed to warp as it dries. I recommend a reed case (like those made by Rico, LaVoz, or Vandoren), as they will prolong the life of your reeds.

Questions?
We hope that this has been informative for our young clarinet players. If you have any other questions, we would be happy to answer them at Willis Music. Next week’s care and feeding lesson: the Trumpet!

Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument: Flute

This post is the first installment of the “Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument” series from Willis Music. This series is geared toward informing the young wind player of some basic cleaning, care, and maintenance techniques to keep your instrument in good working order. Today’s lesson: the flute.

 

As far as the woodwinds go, the flute is the most straightforward when it comes to care and maintenance. The main thing to remember is that woodwinds and water DON’T MIX. There is a small ring of a soft material covered by a film under each key (called a pad) that seals the key to the hole when it is closed. This mechanism is necessary for the instrument to work. When the pads get wet (water, rain, breath condensation), they disintegrate and fail to seal the keys. Pads will need to be replaced occasionally, but it is best to avoid needing to do it prematurely. Proper care of your instrument will ensure that it will last longer.

Necessary Care Supplies:
Cleaning rod
Rod cloth (cotton, flannel, or felt)

Occasional/Optional Care Supplies:
Microfiber Polishing cloth
Key brush
Key cleaning papers
Treated dry polishing cloth for silver
Fine steel wool

Cleaning:
After EVERY USE, you should swab (clean the inside of) your head joint at the very least. If there is visible moisture inside of the body or foot joints, these should be swabbed as well. To swab your instrument, thread a corner of your rod cloth through the loop of the cleaning rod. Drape the rest of the cloth over the rod loop, and turn it around the rod to cover any exposed metal/plastic/wood (the exposed rod could scratch the inside of your instrument). Insert the rod/cloth assembly and gently turn to wipe moisture from the inside of the instrument.

After EVERY to EVERY FEW uses, you should wipe down the outside of your instrument with your rod cloth or a microfiber polishing cloth to remove any dirt or finger oils that may have gotten on the instrument while playing.

OCCASIONALLY, you may want to clean and sanitize the lip plate of your head joint. You can use rubbing alcohol or a mouthpiece cleaning spray with a soft cloth or paper towel for this.

AS NEEDED, you may want to polish the outside of the instrument with a dry treated silver polishing cloth to remove any tarnish that may have developed. This should only be done occasionally, as polish will remove a small layer of the silver plating. Take care not to get any residue on the pads. Only use a DRY cloth intended for this purpose – DO NOT attempt to use a liquid or cream silver polish intended for jewelry.

Tenons:
Tenons are the two joints where the parts of your instrument come together. If they become dirty or bent, it may be difficult to put the instrument together or the joints may become loose and wobbly. When assembling the instrument, take care to be sure that the joints will go straight together, and that you are not putting pressure on the tenon at an angle. If it becomes difficult to assemble your instrument, the tenons may be dirty. Clean them with your rod cloth or polishing cloth, or if they are especially bad, you can gently use fine steel wool to remove any residue. DO NOT attempt to lubricate the tenons with Vaseline or cork grease, as they are not intended to need it. Having a substance on the tenon will attract dirt and make the problem worse. Simply keeping the tenons clean should be sufficient to keep them working well.

Questions?
We hope this has been informative for our young flute players. If you have any other questions, we would be happy to answer them at Willis Music. Keep an eye out for “Care and Feeding of your Clarinet,” coming soon!

New Teacher Alert!

Willis Music Lexington is happy to welcome Chase Clark to their team of qualified teachers. Chase has been working as the Willis Music Lexington Band Rep since the spring, and is happy to teach during the evenings! Read more about Chase below and click here to sign up for lessons today.

 

 

As an educator, Chase has taught at various schools and music camps throughout Kentucky and Tennessee. Teaching with his first instrument, the trombone, Chase has appeared as a guest instructor at prestigious music programs such as Lafayette High School, Beaumont Middle School, Edythe J. Hayes Middle School, and John Hardin High School. Chase also has taught at the Annie Moses Band’s Fine Arts Summer Academy in Nashville, TN since 2010. This fine arts camp trains 200-250 students in which Chase is the primary trombone and low brass instructor, jazz big band section instructor, and a member of the faculty performing groups. As well as teaching across Kentucky and Tennessee, Chase maintains a successful trombone studio of emerging talent in the Lexington, Kentucky area. As a performer, Chase has appeared with an extensive variety of musical groups such as the University of Kentucky’s Opera Orchestra and Jazz Ensemble, the Annie Moses Band, Wycliffe Gordon, and Grammy-award winning artist Bob Mintzer. Chase also recorded with Bob Mintzer on the album “Go” which released in 2011. Chase also joined with the Annie Moses Band to perform in Carnegie Hall in 2012 and the Grand Ole Opry House in 2013. He currently can be heard as lead trombone/soloist with local artists in the Lexington area such as the jazz big band the MetroGnomes, the oldies rock group Big City Groove, and the Lexington Community Orchestra.

 

 

New Teacher Alert!

We are excited to welcome Krista Weiss as a new teacher in our Kenwood and Florence locations. Krista teaches Clarinet and Bass Clarinet. Read more about Krista below and click here to register for lessons today!

Krista Weiss currently serves as principal clarinet of the Columbus Indiana Philharmonic and second clarinet of the Richmond Indiana Symphony. An active freelancer, Krista has recently performed with the Cincinnati Symphony, Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Opera, Lexington Philharmonic, Kentucky Symphony, South Bend Symphony, Fort Wayne Philharmonic, and New World Symphony, as well as on dozens of recordings for the Hal Leonard Corporation. Krista attended Indiana University where she received both her Bachelor and Master’s Degrees in Clarinet Performance. She has also spent several summers participating in music festivals, including the Aspen Music Festival, National Repertory Orchestra, Chautauqua Music Festival, Brevard Music Center, and Marrowstone Music Festival. During the 2010-2011 academic year Krista served as the clarinet instructor at Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana, teaching a full studio of undergraduate and graduate students and performing with the ISU Faculty Woodwind Quintet. She currently serves as a Reserve Method Clinician for D’Addario Woodwinds and has traveled to dozens of schools across the Midwest to give clinics on clarinet fundamentals and equipment. Krista enjoys teaching clarinetists of all ages and abilities and maintains a private studio in the Cincinnati area.

 

Open Hole Flute Tips

Open hole flutes are the step up that every student player is looking forward to, but the change in playing styles can cause a few surprises if you aren’t ready. Here are some tips to help make this transition smooth, fun and musical.  Our Yamaha Allegro flutes are amazing, and every band director raves about their quality and sound. We also have in-store lessons all through the year.

(1) Hold the flute in the proper position, out to your right, parallel to the floor, with elbows away from your body. Sit up straight.

(2) Cradle flute loosely in your hands with fingers resting gently on the keys

(3) As you press keys to form the notes, make sure your fingers completely cover the holes, but don’t pinch too tightly. This is the key to getting the proper tone. Begin by practicing notes that use the least fingers, such as B. Work your way down to D adding fingers as you get a good tone on each note.

(4) As an alternative, you can purchase plugs that slip into the holes in the keys (we have these in our store). These plugs are made from plastic and will close the holes so the instrument plays like a regular flute. They are helpful when learning to play an open-hole flute.

(5) Practice playing with plugs in. Remove one plug at a time, and practice this way until you can comfortably produce the note corresponding with the removed plug. Remove the next plug and practice until comfortable. Proceed until all plugs are removed.

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Amazing Deals! Get them while they are hot!

We just marked down 100s of instruments to some Amazing Pricing! Every department got some items marked down, so now is the time to buy!!!  Stop in today!

Music Money: Customer Loyalty Cards

Do you have Music Money?

At Willis Music in Lexington we like making every day a Customer Appreciation Day! We like it so much that we have trees growing Music Money especially for you.

As a thank you for choosing Willis Music we will give you a gift card after every 6 purchases you make in the store.

After every 6 purchases, you will receive a gift card as a GIFT from Willis Music for 5% of those 6 purchases (not including tax), up to $25.

Be sure to sign up to get your Music Money Card on your next visit to our store!

 

It’s National Hairball Day

cat

Yes, that’s right…

April 25 is National Hairball Day in the United States of America. Makes you wonder why the rest of the world didn’t pick the same day, right?

As musicians, many of us might have been called (lovingly, we hope) hairballs. Some of us have more hair than others. Some of us have funny hair (I checked that box).  There’s a great musical tribute to 80′s rock called Hairballs. There’s even an action game called Hairballs.

But we’re not here to celebrate any of those, today. Today is all about our cats, and their eternal struggle to leave us that messy gift we all hate cleaning up. Below are some tips on keeping your critter hairball free. Hope Whiskers appreciates your efforts.

How to prevent hairballs in cats

1

Be diligent about grooming

Decrease the amount of hair the cat ingests by using a grooming tool like the FURminator deLuxe deShedding Tool, which can reduce shedding by 90 percent. Proactive grooming removes the excess hair that causes hairballs and is a more holistic preventive measure than giving your cat a laxative or allowing him to cough up the blockage.

2

Kitties need fiber, too

Add a little canned pumpkin to the cat’s meals once or twice a week. The fiber in the pumpkin can help move any hair clumps through the system, and your cat will love the tasty treat. Butter can have the same effect, but is high in calories, so pumpkin might be a better choice.

3

Keep your cat hydrated

Encourage the cat to drink plenty of water by placing bowls throughout the house, as the water will help flush out the hair before it has time to clump in the stomach. It is also a great general practice to keep water bowls separate from food bowls to encourage the cat to drink more water.

4

Make over the cat’s menu

Several specially-formulated cat foods aid in the fight against hairballs. Always consult with a vet before making any drastic changes to a cat’s diet. Sudden food changes can sometimes upset the stomach.

5

Know the warning signs

If a hairball problem persists, ask a veterinarian to recommend a supplement to help prevent ingested hairs from clumping. Here are a few signals a cat may have an excessive hairball problem:

  • Frequent dry hacking
  • An overly matted coat
  • Cylindrical (cigar-shaped) masses on the floor or furniture
  • Lethargy or lack of interest in playing or eating
  • Swollen abdomen
  • Constipation

 

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10 Tips to Improve Your Sax Playing

sax

Musicians play music because we love it, but everyone has a beginning point and all of us work to improve our performances. Below are some easy ideas to make your time on a sax better & more fun!

Number 1: Post your fingering chart where you see it on a daily basis

For me, there are always one or two very high notes that I forget if they aren’t in the music pieces I am working on. I have posted my fingering chart by my bed and see it before I fall asleep at night. If you don’t have a fingering chart, buy one! They are small, inexpensive and readily available at most music stores.

Number 2: Wet your reed before you play

The first thing I do when I pull my case out is pop the reed I want to use in my mouth, and keep it there while I assemble my saxophone and sheet music. This helps your reed vibrate more efficiently right when you start playing.

Number 3: Pick a position and stay with it

Depending on who taught you to play the saxophone, you either hold your instrument between your legs or to the right side of your legs. There are merits to both methods, and it is completely personal preference. Try both methods, and then pick the one that you prefer. But either way, stick with it!

Changing your position constantly will hurt your ability to play. This is because you will be concentrating on how to reach that difficult fingering through a different hand position instead of a perfect vibrato or even tone. When you switch positions, the angles change. This changes everything!

Number 4: Posture

Remember when you first started classes or lessons, one of the first things you learned was to sit up straight? We’re back to basics for this tip. By sitting up straight, your diaphragm has more room to expand. This means the ability for longer and more powerful notes, and stronger vibrato and tone.

Number 5: Tighten your Ligature

Have you ever gotten that awful bubbly noise of water under your reed? It will completely destroy any piece you try to play, and sometimes it isn’t possible to stop in the middle of a piece. Turning your ligature joint an extra half turn can make all the difference in the world.

Number 6: Make sure your reed is the right level of hardness

Have you ever stopped playing for about a month, and you start to play with your favorite old reed, and you’re like “Wow! I don’t remember having to push this hard last time I played”? And that is because you didn’t! Your embouchure (the way you handle the mouthpiece and reed in your mouth or the muscles controlling those motions) has grown weaker over the month you’ve been away. On the flip side, if you’ve been playing more than usual your embouchure will have grown stronger. Make sure you get the strength of reed that corresponds with your strength for optimum tone!

Number 7: Use a neck strap

Using a neck strap, especially when you’re playing standing up, is crucial. Distributing the weight off of your thumbs enables your fingers to move more swiftly and efficiently.

Number 8: Cite-read a piece before you start learning it

There are special competitions for cite-reading, for both individuals and bands. Being able to look at a piece of music and run through it a few times, and then being able to play it fairly well shows musical prowess. Cite-reading sometimes, even if you don’t want to compete in it, is a great way to stretch your music reading muscles. I tend to cite-read a piece of music that I am going to learn to play, before I start breaking it down measure by measure. I’ve noticed a dramatic increase in my music reading ability since starting this. To top it off, once you get the hang of cite-reading it is really fun!

Number 9: Play in an area with good lighting

There is nothing worse than playing in an area with subpar lighting. You can’t see the notes right. Playing in the sunshine or in a well light area just improves your mood. I play below a window and have a lamp by the window for playing at night.

Number 10: Invest in high quality reeds

Have you ever had a reed splinter in your mouth? It hurts and tastes really awful. Since then, I have always purchased a higher quality reed. Originally it was to avoid another “Fantastical Exploding Reed” but my tone quality has improved so much. And please, none of those fiberglass reeds. Only reeds made of cane or other natural materials for better tone and control!

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Yamaha’s SILENT Brass Delivers Pure Sound

silent

It’s pretty much impossible to play a brass instrument through headphones. That’s a big deal, and until now there hasn’t been a good way to do it without bothering other people.

Until now!

Yamaha’s SILENT Brass system isn’t new, but the latest evolution opens it up to a wider audience. The idea is this: stick a mute in the instrument so it can be barely heard, then replace the sound with synthesis so the player can still hear through headphones. Traditionally, there are two variables where this goes wrong. The first is the compactness of the physical apparatus. Make it too big, and the system is inconvenient (or can even throw the horn off-balance). The second issue is sound.

Yamaha has been a pioneer in the synthesis field. They were the first to bring physical modeling to market in a real product. Ironically, the breadth of products the company offers has sometimes distracted from some of their best research, but when it comes to replicating brass sound, they stand alone.

Get the two ingredients right – make the physical bit unnoticeable and the sound seem like the real thing – and you can have a headphone experience that approaches playing the instrument all-out. The sound is amazing.

Here’s how the SILENT Brass system works:

  • A mute with a built-in pickup both keeps the instrument quiet and registers your playing as accurately as possible – this component has been made both smaller and more lightweight
  • “Brass Resonance Modeling” simulates the sound of the instrument, here greatly improved in quality
  • A compact “Personal Studio” unit has a headphone jack, plus an input in case you want to play along with a recording.

Getting excited? Click the pic above for a demo, or better yet come by give a SILENT Brass a run for yourself. You’ll be knocked out!

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Great Video of Glass Breaking by Voice!

glass

Some hairbands of the 80′s may have sounded like they were breaking glass with their voices, but the TV show Mythbusters has shown everyone how to do it with a lot less spandex!

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Tired of the Cold Weather Making Playing Music No Fun? Click Here for Great Tips From Willis Music!

ice cold

The weather around here has been kinda cold, snowy & icy lately, and that can make playing your horn a lot less fun. Here are some tips to help you tackle frozen facial muscles when you arrive at rehearsals and concerts:

Tip #1: Wait

Once you come in from the cold at your rehearsal or concert venue, wait. Open your case, but don’t get your instrument out to start warming up straight away. Instead, allow for your body to re-adjust to the warmth, and for the blood to start pumping again to your extremeties, and facial muscles.

Tip #2: Keep your mouthpiece warm

Instead of allowing your mouthpiece to freeze in your instrument case, try keeping your mouthpiece in a pocket close to your body.

Tip #3: A face warmer?

When you arrive at your rehearsal or concert venue, remove your mouthpiece from your pocket or instrument case, and run it under hot water. Once it is hot, press your mouthpiece gently against your cheeks. The warmth from the hot mouthpiece will help thaw frozen facial muscles more quickly.

Tip #4: Cloth and plastic

If you are to be performing outside don’t forget a thin pair of gloves! Some pros invest in a plastic mouthpiece, so that may be of interest as well.

Tip #5: Lip balm

Use a lip balm before you go out in the cold, and after playing. This will help you to prevent sore, dry, and cracked lips. Avoid medicated balms made for cold sores since these can actually dry your lips out.

Written by “Mohawk” Mike, Louisville Store Manager/Arctic Studies Hobbyist

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Step Up to Yamaha – Triple Rebate Day

Thats right – Triple Rebates!!

On November 29, 2013, we will be offering triple rebates on Yamaha band instruments. This will be the best time to buy a step up or pro instrument!!  Turn your rebate into $150 or $300! This is a special event just for Willis Music. Call today to schedule your appointment to get the best selection. 859-525-6050

YAMAHA BAND TRIPLE REBATE DAY!!

In case you didn’t know it, Willis Music is now your Yamaha Band Headquarters!

That’s right, just in time for the best time of year… the Step Up to Yamaha event. From now until the end of the year, Yamaha has a mail in rebate for you, but for 1 special day we get to do DOUBLE rebates from Yamaha AND Willis wants to make it TRIPLE! Thats right, a TRIPLE REBATE!! November 29, 2013 is the BEST time to buy your Yamaha Band instrument. Stop in today and throw it in layaway, get it out that day and still receive the TRIPLE rebate!! This is the sale you have been waiting for!

Violins as Colorful as the Music You Make!

stentor violins

The sound of the orchestra’s stringed instruments is rich and full of emotion and color. We thought it would be great if we could find violins in colors as vibrant as their sound, and we have. Stentor makes instruments that not only sound great, but look great, too! Drop by and check out our display soon- these are sure to move fast.

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Annual Indoor Yard Sale – Deal Seekers!!

Love Yard Saleing but Hate Going Outside?

Thursday Sept 19 – Sunday Sept 22 is our Annual Indoor Yard Sale!

~ Receive killer deals on new, fully warrantied plus Willis extended warrantied, items

~ Receive 10% of your purchase over $500 or more in a gift card to be used on a future purchase!

~ Receive DOUBLE blocks on Willis Music Money cards!

~ Receive extra FREE goods on certain closeouts until supplies run out!

~ Receive mega discounts on hundreds of accessories!

~ Receive 50% off vintage sheet music titles!

See a sample of instrument deals online at www.willismusic.com/yardsale

See ya there! It will be a blast!

USED GEAR MONTH AT WILLIS MUSIC TRI COUNTY!!

We will give you an extra 10% off your new instrument when you trade in your old unwanted gear!!

That’s right folks, you read it correctly!  Every Friday & Saturday through September, anytime you trade in your old gear, we will give you another 10% off the already Promised Lowest Price of your new instrument!  Please call Kevin the Manager to set up a time to bring in your gear, but ANY of our staff is happy to help you select your new instrument.  (Must be 18 or over to trade/sell gear to the store)

See you soon!!!

Name Your Own Price????

brando 3

We hear it on the radio… “No reasonable offers refused”. Sounds too good to be true, but isn’t it worth a look? If you could get a great product at a price you name wouldn’t you be pumped?

Willis Music not only has the coolest, most current musical equipment in Louisville, we also have great used gear at killer prices. But maybe the price could be even more killer, huh? When you see the tag above on instruments in our store, that means we’re opening the door to you setting a price. We’ll do everything we can to meet your offer. If we aren’t able to take your offer, we’ll make a counter-offer so you know we’re 100% serious about giving you the very best deal around.

Look for Mr. Brando. Get great gear. Save some money.

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NEW! NEW! NEW! NEW STUFF!

NEW STUFF!

That’s right, we have gotten a shipment of a bunch of NEW stuff never seen before here at Willis Music! Something for everyone – our expanded band selection will help any bandy get back to school jammin, Chauvet lighting – it will light up your world, Red Witch pedals – the Seven Sisters pedals will rock for 300 hours after 1 charge!

There is so much more that we can’t even list it all, but stop by and you wont be disappointed!! See you soon, hurry, come on… you are still reading and  you should be in the car!

BIG BAND BONANZA! It’s time to Step Up!

July 18th- Join us at Willis Music Tri County Mall for the absolute BEST time to select your intermediate, advanced, or pro grade instrument!

We will have specialists ON SITE from: Jupiter, Bach, LeBlanc, Selmer, Conn, Buffet Crampon, Keilwerth, King, Gemeinhardt, Besson, B&S, and Courtois.  Yes!  That’s correct, 12 brands on site to choose from!!!

Have an instrument you want to upgrade? TRADE IT IN!  Need time to pay it off?  Financing will be available!  Excited?  Let us know you coming!!

Questions & Interest?  Email: tricounty@willis-music.com or call Stephanie or Kevin: 513.671.3288!

SPRING INTO SUMMER VIP EVENT

June 22 is going to be a blast!

We are going to have our Spring into Summer VIP event. We will have live music all day, a cookout from 12-2, giveaways throughout the day (must be present to win), factory reps in the store, Terry from Cook Instrument repair will be here 11-3 giving away strings with a paid setup, and of course special pricing on everything in the store! We will announce the band line up soon, but I promise you it will be awesome!

See ya there!

The Sound of Your Art

east violin

Eastman’s violins are works of art you get to hold. The tone makes you want to close your eyes as the music you make takes you to places a car never could. Whether you’re a new musician or seasoned player, an Eastman instrument will improve your playing simply because the stunning attention to every detail makes each violin a singular example of inspiration. You deserve this…  try one today!

Click the pic for a cool violin/guitar jam session video & contact us at 502-426-1818 if you’d like to sign up for violin/fiddle lessons!

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