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West Chester November 2017 Events Calendar

November 1st – Rik Allen of Def Leppard’s Birthday -10% off Drumsticks, 50% off if we only have ½ a set.
November 4th – King Tut Day – 5% off if you mention and walk like an Egyptian
November 6th – Saxophone Day – 5% off of a saxophone and saxophone accessories if you mention.
November 9th – Open Mic/Jam – Come one, come all and jam for and with us! 5pm to 8pm.
November 10th – Greg Lake’s Birthday (Emerson, Lake, and Palmer/King Crimson) 5% off of synths or workstations for mentioning.
November 14th – Worship Musician Night – Join us for a great night of fellowship and jamming! There will be cookies!
November 17th, 18th, and 19th – Annual Warehouse Sale, 7380 Industrial Rd., Florence, Ky 41042
November 23rd – Thanksgiving – Store Closed
November 24th – Black Friday – Store open 9am to 8pm
November 25th – Store open 10am to 8pm
November 25th – Open/Mic Jam – come jam with us! 12pm to 4pm
November 26th – Store Open 12pm to 6pm
November 29th- Square Dance Day! – 5% off of your order if you do a little square dancing and mention this.
Now until December 31’s – University Pricing Piano Sale
Step up to Yamaha Dec 2nd.

 

West Chester October 2017 Events Calendar

 

October 2nd – Don McLean’s Birthday – 5% off American Made guitars for mentioning. 

October 7th – Bald and Free Day – Don’t cover it up with a hat, let your chrome dome shine and mention this for 5% off today!

October 10th – Worship Musician Night – Join us for a great night of fellowship and jamming! There will be cookies!

October 12th –  Open Jam/Mic – Come one come all, lets Play! 5 to 8pm

October 13th – Friday the 13th – 5% off Halloween Music.  Or 10% off if your name happens to be Jason and you’re wearing a hockey mask.

October 18th – Yamaha Montage Clinic – With Blake Angelos and Steve Hauer from Yamaha.  Come learn all about this amazing keyboard. 6 to 7:30 PM.

October 16th – John Mayer’s Birthday – 5% off PRS guitars for mentioning.

October 21st – Sweetest Day – Come buy your sweetie a new guitar, 5% off for mentioning.

October 23rd thru October 31st –  Creepy Composers Sale.

October 28th – Open Jam/Mic – 12 to 4pm, come out and play!

Save the date for our Annual Warehouse Sale!  Nov 17th, 18th, and 19th.

Step up to Yamaha Dec 2nd.

West Chester September Events Calendar

September 6th – Fight Procrastination Day! –  I’ll explain this later!

September 8th – Pink’s Birthday  5% off anything pink.

September 10th- Grandparents Day.  5% off for all grandparents, mention at checkout!

September 12th – Worship Musician’s Night – to learn more click here!

September 14th – Open Jam/Mic.  To learn more click here!

September 19th – International Talk Like a Pirate Day!  5% off for talking like a pirate arrrrhhh!

September 21st – Don Felder from Eagles fame’s birthday.  5% for mentioning, 10% off if you play the solo to Hotel California

September 25th – Will Smith’s birthday – 5% off for rapping the theme from Fresh Prince

September 28th – Ask a Stupid Question Day!  – 5% off if you mention and then put up with our stupid answer.

September 30th – Open Jam/Mic.  To learn more click here!

 

West Chester August 2017 Events Calendar

August 4th – U. S. Coast Guard Day – 10% off current and former members.

August 8th – Worship Musicians Night

August 10th – Open Mic/Jam! Come one come all!  5 to 8 pm.

August 13th – Left Hander’s Day – 5% off left handed guitars

August 18th – Bad Poetry Day – 5% off if you recite us a bad poem.

August 26th – Open Mic/Jam 12pm to 4pm

August 27th – Just Because Day – 5% off just because you mentioned this.

West Chester July Calendar of Events

July 1st – International Joke Day – 5% off if you come in and tell us a joke.

July 2nd – I Forgot Day – What? Huh? Squirell!!!

July 4th – Independence Day – Store open from 11am to 4 pm.

July 6th – Bill Haley’s Birthday – Rock around the clock and take 5% off of Hollow Body guitars.

July 11th – Worship Musicians Night

July 13th – Open Mic/Jam! Come one come all!  5 to 8 pm.

July 13th – Embrace Your Geekness Day – Channel your inner Erkel and get those pocket protectors out, show us yours for 5% off.

July 13th through 15th – National Association of Musical Merchants (NAMM) Show in Nashville.  Our buyers and some of our crew will be there checking out all the new products.  Watch Facebook for live updates and pics!

July 19th – Stick Out Your Tongue Day1 – 5% off if you do!

July 20th -23rd — Create Your Own Discount! For more info, please visit: willismusic.com/discount2017

July 26th – Roger Taylor from Queen’s Birthday – 5% off for singing Bohemian Rhapsody      

July 29th – Open Mic/Jam 12pm to 4pm

July 31st – Uncommon Musical Instrument Day – Dust off that hurdy gurdy or any weird instrument and bring it in to show us and get 5% off.

West Chester June Events Calendar

June 1st – Say Something Nice Day! – Come in and say something nice and get 5% Off.

June 7th – Prince’s Birthday – 5% off electric guitars.

June 12th – Chick Corea’s Birthday -5% off synthesizers.

June 15th – Open Jam! Come one come all!  5 to 8 pm.

June 17th – World Juggling Day – 5% off if you come in and juggle. 

June 20th – Brian Wilson’s Birthday – 5% off Jaguars and Jazzmasters

June 24th – Open Jam! Come one come all!  12 to 4 pm.

June 30th – Ygwie Malmseen’s Birthday – 5% off Strats.

West Chester May 2017 Events Calendar

May 1st – Tim McGraw’s Birthday – 5% off Acoustic Guitars

May 4th – Star Wars Day – 10% off for anyone dressed as a character.

May 8th – Joe Bonamossa’s Birthday – 5% off electric guitars.

May 13th – Stevie Wonder’s Birthday – 5% off keyboards

May 14th – Dance Like a Chicken Day –  5% off for doing the chicken dance while here.

May 22nd –  Talk Like Yoda Day – 5% off you will get for talking like Yoda during your transaction.

May 23rd – Annual VIP Event – More details to come

May 24th – Bob Dylan’s Birthday – 10% off harmonicas.

May 26th – Miles Davis’ Birthday – 5% off trumpets.

May 27th –  Monthly Open Jam!!!

Roland EC-10M El Cajon Mic Processor

We just opened the Roland EC-10M El Cajon mic and cajon processor, Daniel Romeiro gives us a sneak peak.  Stop in to try it out!

 

March 5th – Cinco de Marcho – Why not celebrate 2 months early?
March 8th – National Preoofreading Day – Proof this and get 5% off for mentioning.
March 12th – Steve Harris’ Birthday – 5% off any Fender P-bass
March 17th – 10% off anything green
March 22nd – Come in and goof off!
March 25th – Open Jam! Come in and jam with us! 12pm to 4pm
March 26th – Make Up Your Own Holiday Day! 5% off if you mention.
March 30th – Eric Clapton’s Birthday – 5% off Fender Strats.

West Chester February 2017 Calendar of Events

Feb. 3rd – Play Your Ukulele Day. 10% Off Ukuleles today for mentioning this.
Feb. 6th – Rick Astley’s Birthday. He’ll never let you down, and neither will we, 10% off for mentioning.
Feb. 13th – Clean Out Your Computer Day. Make some room to record! 5% off interfaces today for mentioning.
Feb. 16th – Do a Grouch a Favor Day. Buy them an acoustic guitar! 5% off for mentioning.
Feb 23rd – 26th – Annual Willis Penny Sale
Feb. 27th – Neil Schon’s Birthday. Don’t stop believing that we’ll give you 5% off your purchase for mentioning.

West Chester December Calendar

december-calendar

Willis and Moeller Music Welcome Fender Supro Amps

LEARN ALL ABOUT THE SUPRO AMP.

Wills and Moeller Music proudly welcome Supro Amps to our West Chester and Lexington stores. These legendary amps are a tone freak’s dream. they are small, compact, low wattage, class A tube amps that deliver a huge sound. For those of you that have never heard of Supro all you need to know is that you have heard them, even if you didn’t know it. These are the amps that legendary Chicago blues players used in the 50’s and 60’s. They were originally low cost amps that were work horses and were everywhere. Their unique circuitry allowed them to achieve a great tone that was utilized by great players like Jimi Hendrix, Link Wray, David Bowie and Dan Auerbach. The most famous user however was Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin. In 1968, Page used a Tele plugged into a customized 1 x 12 Supro combo amp to record all of the guitar parts on Led Zeppelin’s debut album. The solo to Stairway to Heaven was played on a Supro. The great irony is that Supro went out of business during that same year!

Supro Amp Image

Supro was reborn in 2013 and now you can achieve that same great tone. The signature element of a Supro amp is its “Class-A” power section, which maintains remarkable clarity and dynamics when overdriven. This gritty mid-range sound is the original alternative to Fender… you could call it “the other white meat” of classic American tone! Every element of our Supro reissue amps has been designed from the ground up to bring this long lost, holy-grail amp to musicians at a working players price. The Blue Rhino Hide tolex was specially made, the cabinetry is vintage-correct, the speakers are totally unique, the transformers are custom and the sound is 100% authentic Supro. Supro reissue amps are hand assembled in Port Jefferson, NY, USA.

I plugged an American Elite Fender Shawbucker Strat into the Saturn Reverb the night they came in. No effects, just guitar, cable, amp. I plugged into the 1+2 input, turned on a bit of reverb, and turned it all the way up. With the bridge humbucker selected instantly I had that classic ‘Whole Lotta Love” tone. Even with the volume on 10 though it was loud but comfortably loud. The kind of tone that if you put a SM57 in front of it you’d have all the amp you will need.

Loud enough for you to overcome the drummer on stage for you, but still not ear splitting and workable for a sound system. Back the volume off on the guitar and switch to the neck single coil, and you get the perfect blues tone. play lightly its as clean as a whistle, play hard it breaks up nicely and sings. I plugged a couple of different overdrive pedals In and achieved the same kind of tone at a lower volume. I added a phaser to the mix and just fell in love. A tele plugged into it got that nice Brad Paisley like tone.

Stop by and try one out with your favorite guitar and effects today.

West Chester June Events Calendar

May Cincinnati Band Of The Month

Dallas Moore our April Cincinnati Band Of The Month, is an American Outlaw/Honky-Tonk artist and award winning songwriter of the number one hits”Texas Tornado” “Crazy Again” and “Blessed Be The Bad Ones.” Touring relentlessly with The Dallas Moore Band as well as regular solo acoustic appearances for the Last Honky Tonk Music Series and Frank Brown International Songwriters Festival in Perdido Key, Florida, Moore consistently performs over 300 shows a year coast to coast in the USA.

The Dark Horse Rider album featuring 10 new Dallas Moore originals was released on Sol Records in January of 2015. The Dallas Moore Band is currently nominated for Outlaw Group of the Year at the 2016 Ameripolitan Music Awards in Austin,Texas and for Country Artist of the Year and Singer/Songwriter of the year at the 2016 CEA Awards in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Dallas Moore’s music is featured regularly on Sirius/XM Satellite Radio’s Outlaw Country Channel 60, CMT.com, Yallwire.com and terrestrial AM/FM radio in America, Canada, Europe, Australia and Brazil. You’ll also find Moore profiled in the book “Outlaws Still At Large!” by author Neil Alexander Hamilton along with Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, David Allan Coe, Blackberry Smoke, Wayne Mills & more.

Band Members

Dallas Moore
Bob Rutherford
Chuck Morpurgo
Rocky ParnellApril Cincinnati Band Of The Month 534627_10151261305312254_1315671013_n
Mike Owens

Now that you have met the band, go check them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, anywhere you can find them online! Come in to Willis at Moeller Music West Chester and show an associate that you “Liked” their music page on Facebook and receive discounts!

The Dallas Moore Band keeps their fans updated with the latest news, music, merchandise, promotions and whatever through various social media accounts. Some accounts are exclusive to certain media.

http://www.dallasmoore.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thedallasmooreband/timeline

https://twitter.com/dallasmoore

https://www.instagram.com/dallasmooreband/

 

Want to be the next Band of the Month? Check out how HERE!

 

March Cincinnati Band of the Month

 

Misnomer was born in basements. Originally from the northern suburbs of Cincinnati, Misnomer is a band full of interesting individuals that set out to break down the conventional boundaries of popular music. By implementing various influences and styles, Misnomer offers a familiar sound that exists within the paradox of “contemporary” versus “classic”.  They refuse to recycle, yet retain a sense of familiarity and freshness. The music that is produced by their individualistic, non-generic format has the effect of making an audience want to shake their booties, bang their heads, and groove with euphoric melancholy, through a sound that has never reached ears before.

In the early years of the band, Randy Clark (drummer) and Kyler Davis (guitar/vocals) formed a strong relationship based solely around a mutual love for the art, craft, and expression of music. After developing their abilities further, they decided to recruit Dominic Franco (bassist) to the line-up. As a 3-piece, they established themselves and developed an identity through their interesting and unique sound and approach. Misnomer added the fourth member, Logan Brown (multi-instrumentalist), after collaborating with him to independently record and release their first full length album.

Misnomer has played in the Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus, and Northern Kentucky circuit for roughly 4 years. After finally picking up momentum, they decided to release their first full-length album in early 2016, which will be followed by an extensive tour in the summer.

Now that you have met the band, go check them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, anywhere you can find them online! Come in to Willis at Moeller Music West Chester and show an associate that you “Liked” their music page on Facebook and receive discounts!

Misnomer keeps their fans updated with the latest news, music, merchandise, promotions and whatever through various social media accounts.

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/MisnomerOfficial/

https://twitter.com/misnomermusic

https://www.instagram.com/misnomer_official/

Want to be the next Band Of The Month in Cincinnati? Click Here!

Cincinnati February Band of the Month

The Fox Collective is an alternative indie rock band from Lebanon, Ohio. The band was formed by musicians who came from different genre bands to collectively fulfill a specific sound. Inspired by bands and things such as Dance Gavin Dance, Circa Survive, Misnomer, Expeditions and nature itself. Currently the band has been together for nearly a year writing, practicing and recording to release their “Naked” EP. The Naked EP will be made to move you in a subtle yet exciting rush with pretty melodies and in your face riffs.

Members!

James Arnold / Vocals
Josh Allen / Guitar
Andy Mitchell / Guitar
Daquon Brice / Bass
Michael / Drums

Now that you have met the band, go check them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, anywhere you can find them online! Come in to Willis at Moeller Music West Chester and show an associate that you “Liked” their music page on Facebook and receive discounts!

The Fox Collective keeps their fans updated with the latest news, music, merchandise, promotions and whatever through various social media accounts. Some accounts are exclusive to certain media.

Facebook.com/collectivefoxes
Twitter.com/collectivefoxes
Instagram.com/thefoxcollectiveband
Tumblr.com/thefoxcollectiveband

January Cincinnati Band of the Month – Stone Mountain Mafia

Willis at Moeller Music West Chester’s Band of the Month is:  Stone Mountain Mafia

 

 

 

Stone Mountain Mafia is a Southern Fried Rock Band
That mixes the power and energy of Arena Rockers
of old with the country cool soul of bands like the
Allman Brothers, Lynyrd Skynyrd and others to form a very unique Sound that solidifies their reputation as The Premier Southern Rock Band in the Tri state Area.
These guys are the Torch Bearers of real Rock music not beholden to trends or cliches. 4 on the floor ROCK!
Stone Mountain Mafia is…
Brett Brock… Lead Vocals, Guitar.
Jamie Cook… Bass, Backing Vocals.
Chris Lester… Lead / Rhythm Guitar Backing Vocals.
Cecil Delloma … Lead / Rhythm Guitar, Backing Vocals.
Gary Miller… Drums / percussion & backing vocals.

Now that you have met the band, go check them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, anywhere you can find them online! Come in to Willis at Moeller Music West Chester and show an associate that you “Liked” their music page on Facebook and receive discounts!

Cincinnati Band of the Month! The Danny Frazier Band

The Danny Frazier Band is a regional touring group performing original music, authentic music, and the music of Americana. They are also Willis Music’s band of the month!
Every month Willis music chooses and promotes a “Band of the month”. We do this to help our local bands obtain more exposure and share their talents!  Come in and show us that you have liked them on social media and we’ll give you 15% off your purchase that day!
Danny from the Danny Frazier band was born in Kerville, Texas. He relocated to Covington, Kentucky where shorty after, his band Frazier River signed with RCA Decca Records out of Nashville. The band then toured across the country in support of their album.
Since the release Danny has been performing nonstop solo and acoustic under the name of Danny Frazier Band.
Today the lineup of the band includes:
– Nick Netherten on Guitar/Fiddle
– Gregg Amburgey on Bass
– Bobby Armstrong on Drums
– Danny Frazier on Guitar and Vocals
This current lineup has been together for two years now and still going! They released an album last year entitled “Something Right”.
The Danny Frazier Band performs every weekend. They are definitely worth the drive! You can also find them on Facebook and dannyfrazierband.com! Check them out!

Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument: Trombone

This post is the final installment of our “Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument” series. This series is geared toward informing the young wind player of some basic cleaning, care, and maintenance techniques to keep your instrument in good working order. Today’s lesson: the trombone.

 

The most important element to trombone maintenance is the slide. There are several slide lubricant options, but the important thing to remember is to keep it moving freely. Whenever you are playing, be aware of your surroundings so you don’t accidentally hit your slide on your chair or stand. The smallest dent or bend in the slide can make it not function properly, and this is an issue that needs to be taken to a professional repair person.

Necessary Care Supplies:
Slide lubricant (your teacher may recommend one of the following):
Slide oil
Slide cream and water spray
Formulated product (like Slide-O-Mix)
Slide grease (for tuning slide only)
Bore snake
Mouthpiece brush

Optional Care Supplies:
Polishing cloth

Water Key:
You should CONSTANTLY empty your water key (spit valve). This means every several minutes while you are playing, and especially before you return the trombone to its case. Simply press the water key to hold it open, and blow air through the instrument so moisture will leave through the valve (it might be handy to keep a paper towel to empty your valve onto so you don’t leave a puddle).

Main Slide:
It is extremely important to keep your main slide well lubricated – both for the condition of the instrument, and for ease of playing. Your slide will need to be lubricated FREQUENTLY, probably each time that you play. There are several different options:

  • Slide oil: the most straightforward option, and may be best for beginners. Simply extend your slide, apply slide oil to the inner slide, and move the slide in and out to distribute the oil.
  • Slide cream: slide cream requires water to work properly. Apply slide cream to the inner slide, and spray some clean water (from a spray bottle) to the slide before moving it to distribute. Some musicians like this method as it allows the slide to move very fast, and the cream does not need to be applied as often – only the water spray. The downside to the slide cream is that residue tends to build up on the slide faster than with oil, so you may need to clean your instrument more frequently.
  • Formulated products: there are many other products out there (one of the most popular is called Slide-O-Mix). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on any type of product.

Tuning Slide:
REGULARLY, move the tuning slide on the instrument. This will prevent it from “freezing” (getting stuck). OCCASIONALLY, you should grease your slide to clean it and keep it moving freely. Simply remove the slide (pay attention to which direction it faces so you can put it back correctly), apply a small amount of slide grease to the inner slide, and replace it. Wipe off any excess grease. (Note that this is a different type of grease than the one you use for your main slide)

Cleaning:
OCCASIONALLY (every 6-8 weeks or so), you should clean the inside of your trombone. Mark Flegg has a great article on thoroughly cleaning your trumpet (http://markflegg.com/instruction/how-to-clean-your-trumpet/) that can apply to the trombone as well. The good news is that your entire trombone can be submerged in water! Fill a bathtub with warm (not hot) water (you can also add a small amount of dish soap). Remove the main slide and tuning slide from the trombone and place them in the water. Let them soak for a few minutes, then use your bore snake to clean the insides (insert in one end and push through until you can pull the whole apparatus through the other end). Next submerge the body of the trombone in the water and do the same. Use whatever combination of snake and brushes you need to in order to clean the inside of all of the tubing. Rinse each part of the instrument with clean running water, and allow to air dry. Grease your slides with the appropriate materials, and reassemble.

Use your mouthpiece brush (cone-shaped) to gently clean your mouthpiece AS NEEDED. You can use a mouthpiece sanitizing/cleaning spray, or a small amount of dish soap and warm water. DO NOT put your mouthpiece in the dishwasher.

OCCASIONALLY (once a week or so), you may want to use a dry (untreated) polishing cloth to wipe any dirt and residue from the outside of your trombone. The oils from your fingers can cause the finish to deteriorate if not occasionally wiped off.

Questions?
We hope that this has been informative for our young trombone players. If you have any other questions, we would be happy to answer them at Willis Music. Good luck!

Care and Feeding of Your Band Instrument: Trumpet

This post is the fourth installment of our “Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument” series. This series is geared toward informing the young wind player of some basic cleaning, care, and maintenance techniques to keep your instrument in good working order. Today’s lesson: the trumpet.

 

Care of any brass instrument is fairly straightforward. The most important thing to remember is to regularly empty water, and keep valves and slides lubricated.

Necessary Care Supplies:
Valve oil
Slide grease
Bore snake
Valve casing brush
Mouthpiece brush

Optional Care Supplies:
Polishing cloth

Water Key:
You should CONSTANTLY empty your water key (spit valve). This means every several minutes while you are playing, and especially before you return the trumpet to its case. Simply press the water key to hold it open, and blow air through the instrument so moisture will leave through the valve (it might be handy to keep a paper towel to empty your valve onto so you don’t leave a puddle).

Valves:
Valves should be oiled REGULARLY: at least once a week, and every time they don’t move freely. To oil the valves, unscrew the valve caps at the top of each valve case (be careful not to unscrew the valve buttons!). Pull the valve straight up out of the valve casing. Apply a few drops of valve oil to the lower part of each valve (the part with the holes, usually a darker metal). You don’t need oil in the holes, just on the outside of the cylinder. Be especially careful when replacing the valves – if they are in the wrong order or not aligned correctly, your trumpet will not work! Usually, the valves will have a 1, 2, and 3 printed on them. More often than not, the numbers on the valves should face the lead pipe. There is also an internal mechanism called a valve guide – it should make the valve lock into place when it is in position if it is gently turned in the valve casing.

Slides:
REGULARLY, (once a week or so), move each of the slides on the instrument. This will prevent them from “freezing” (getting stuck). OCCASIONALLY, you should grease your slides to clean them and keep them moving freely. Simply remove the slide (pay attention to which direction it faces so you can put it back correctly), apply a small amount of slide grease to the inner slide, and replace it. Wipe off any excess grease.

Cleaning:
OCCASIONALLY (every 6-8 weeks or so), you should clean the inside of your trumpet. Mark Flegg has a great article on thoroughly cleaning your trumpet (http://markflegg.com/instruction/how-to-clean-your-trumpet/). The good news is that most of your trumpet can be submerged in water! Fill a sink or bathtub with warm (not hot) water (you can also add a small amount of dish soap). Remove the valves from your trumpet and set them aside. Remove each of the slides from the trumpet and place them in the water. Let them soak for a few minutes, then use your bore snake to clean the insides (insert in one end and push through until you can pull the whole apparatus through the other end). Next submerge the body of the trumpet (minus the valves) in the water and do the same. Use whatever combination of snake and brushes you need to in order to clean the inside of all of the tubing. For the valves, gently clean the bottom section with the ports/holes (where you put valve oil) with the water/dish soap. DO NOT submerge the valves in water – the only part of the trumpet that shouldn’t get wet is the felt rings at the tops of the valves. Rinse each part of the instrument with clean running water, and allow to air dry. Oil your valves, grease your slides, and reassemble.

Use your mouthpiece brush (cone-shaped) to gently clean your mouthpiece AS NEEDED. You can use a mouthpiece sanitizing/cleaning spray, or a small amount of dish soap and warm water. DO NOT put your mouthpiece in the dishwasher.

OCCASIONALLY (once a week or so), you may want to use a dry (untreated) polishing cloth to wipe any dirt and residue from the outside of your trumpet. The oils from your fingers can cause the finish to deteriorate if not occasionally wiped off.

Questions?
We hope that this has been informative for our young trumpet players. If you have any other questions, we would be happy to answer them at Willis Music. Next care and feeding lesson: the trombone!

Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument: Saxophone

This post is the third installment of the “Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument” series from Willis Music. This series is geared toward informing the young wind player of some basic cleaning, care, and maintenance techniques to keep your instrument in good working order. Today’s lesson: the saxophone.

 

Like all woodwinds, one of the most important things to remember is that woodwinds and water don’t mix! There is a small disk of a soft material covered by a film or leather under each key (called a pad) that seals the key to the hole when it is closed. This mechanism is necessary for the instrument to work. When the pads get wet (water, rain, breath condensation), they disintegrate and fail to seal the keys. Pads will need to be replaced occasionally, but it is best to avoid needing to do it prematurely. Proper care of your instrument will ensure that it will last longer. The other big element to saxophone care is the reeds, which will have its own section below.

Necessary Care Supplies:
Swab
Cork Grease

Optional/Occasional Care Supplies:
Mouthpiece brush
Key brush
Polishing cloth
Reed Guard
Padguard

Cleaning:
After EVERY USE, you should swab (clean the inside of) your saxophone. The swab should consist of a piece of material (and perhaps a piece of foam or bristle) attached to a long string with a weight on the end. Remove your reed, mouthpiece, and neck. Make sure the swab is unfolded completely, and drop the weight through the bell. Turn and gently shake your saxophone until the weight drops out the other end, and pull the fabric through. Gently shake moisture from the neck (if the swab will fit through the neck, swab it as well).

The other option is a pair of items, often called a “Padsaver” and a “Necksaver.” These are flexible, fuzzy rods that are inserted into the instrument and left there to wick moisture from the pads. These are acceptable as well.

Use your mouthpiece brush (cone-shaped) to gently clean your mouthpiece AS NEEDED. You can use a mouthpiece sanitizing/cleaning spray, or a small amount of dish soap and warm water. DO NOT put your mouthpiece in the dishwasher – it is not made to handle the heat and will warp and be ruined.

OCCASIONALLY (once a week or so), you may want to use a dry (untreated) polishing cloth to wipe any dirt and residue from the outside of your saxophone. Pay special attention to the keys – the oils from your fingers can cause the finish to deteriorate if not occasionally wiped off.

Cork:
The first several times you use your instrument, then EVERY FEW USES after that, you should grease your neck cork. The neck cork is a tube of cork on the next where the mouthpiece is attached. It creates a seal so that air cannot escape when the instrument is assembled. Apply a small amount of cork grease to the neck cork to make the mouthpiece easier to attach, and to condition the cork so it will last longer.

Reeds:
Reeds are one of the most important (and can be one of the most frustrating!) elements of caring for your saxophone. They are both the most fragile part of the instrument, and the part essential for creating a good sound (or any sound at all!). Take extra care when handling reeds and assembling your instrument not to let the tip (thin end) touch anything. The tiniest chip or crack will cause problems with your reeds. Proper storage when not playing is also essential to keep the reed from breaking or warping. NEVER leave your reed on your mouthpiece when you put your instrument away, it should always be removed and stored in its own case. Most reeds are sold in individual plastic protector sleeves – these are effective in preventing breaks, but can still allow the reed to warp as it dries. I recommend a reed case (like those made by Rico, LaVoz, or Vandoren), as they will prolong the life of your reeds.

Questions?
We hope that this has been informative for our young clarinet players. If you have any other questions, we would be happy to answer them at Willis Music. Next week’s care and feeding lesson: the Trumpet!

Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument: Clarinet

This post is the second installment of our “Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument” series from Willis Music.  This series is geared toward informing the young wind player of some basic cleaning, care, and maintenance techniques to keep your instrument in good working order. Today’s lesson: the clarinet.

 

Like all woodwinds, one of the most important things to remember is that woodwinds and water don’t mix! There is a small disk of a soft material covered by a film under each key (called a pad) that seals the key to the hole when it is closed. This mechanism is necessary for the instrument to work. When the pads get wet (water, rain, breath condensation), they disintegrate and fail to seal the keys. Pads will need to be replaced occasionally, but it is best to avoid needing to do it prematurely. Proper care of your instrument will ensure that it will last longer. The other big element to clarinet care is the reeds, which will have its own section below.

Necessary Care Supplies:
Swab
Cork Grease

Occasional/Optional Care Supplies:
Mouthpiece brush
Key brush
Polishing cloth
Reed Guard

Cleaning:
After EVERY USE, you should swab (clean the inside of) your clarinet. The swab should consist of a piece of material attached to a long string with a weight on the other end. After removing your reed, make sure the swab is unfolded completely, turn your clarinet upside down, drop the weight through the bell until it drops out the other end, and pull the fabric through. (Depending on how long the string is, you may need to swab your clarinet in 2 sections)

Use your mouthpiece brush (cone-shaped) to gently clean your mouthpiece AS NEEDED. You can use a mouthpiece sanitizing/cleaning spray, or a small amount of dish soap and warm water (just be sure to dry the cork very carefully and allow it to dry completely before you put it back in the case). DO NOT put your mouthpiece in the dishwasher – it is not made to handle the heat and will warp and be ruined.

Use your key brush (small, cylindrical) AS NEEDED to gently clean any buildup that may occur in your finger holes.

OCCASIONALLY (once a week or so), you may want to use a dry (untreated) polishing cloth to wipe any dirt and residue from the outside of your clarinet. Pay special attention to the keys – the oils from your fingers can cause the finish to deteriorate if not occasionally wiped off.

Corks:
The first several times you use your instrument, then EVERY FEW USES after that, you should grease your tenon corks. Tenon corks are the rings of cork that are found where each section joins together (including on the mouthpiece). They create a seal so that air cannot escape when the instrument is assembled. Apply a small amount of cork grease to the tenon corks to make the instrument easier to assemble, and to condition the cork so it will last longer.

Reeds:
Reeds are one of the most important (and can be one of the most frustrating!) elements of caring for your clarinet. They are both the most fragile part of the instrument, and the part essential for creating a good sound (or any sound at all!). Take extra care when handling reeds and assembling your instrument not to let the tip (thin end) touch anything. The tiniest chip or crack will cause problems with your reeds. Proper storage when not playing is also essential to keep the reed from breaking or warping. NEVER leave your reed on your mouthpiece when you put your instrument away, it should always be removed and stored in its own case. Most reeds are sold in individual plastic protector sleeves – these are effective in preventing breaks, but can still allow the reed to warp as it dries. I recommend a reed case (like those made by Rico, LaVoz, or Vandoren), as they will prolong the life of your reeds.

Questions?
We hope that this has been informative for our young clarinet players. If you have any other questions, we would be happy to answer them at Willis Music. Next week’s care and feeding lesson: the Saxophone!

Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument: Flute

This post is the first installment of the “Care and Feeding of your Band Instrument” series from Willis Music. This series is geared toward informing the young wind player of some basic cleaning, care, and maintenance techniques to keep your instrument in good working order. Today’s lesson: the flute.

 

As far as the woodwinds go, the flute is the most straightforward when it comes to care and maintenance. The main thing to remember is that woodwinds and water DON’T MIX. There is a small ring of a soft material covered by a film under each key (called a pad) that seals the key to the hole when it is closed. This mechanism is necessary for the instrument to work. When the pads get wet (water, rain, breath condensation), they disintegrate and fail to seal the keys. Pads will need to be replaced occasionally, but it is best to avoid needing to do it prematurely. Proper care of your instrument will ensure that it will last longer.

Necessary Care Supplies:
Cleaning rod
Rod cloth (cotton, flannel, or felt)

Occasional/Optional Care Supplies:
Microfiber Polishing cloth
Key brush
Key cleaning papers
Treated dry polishing cloth for silver
Fine steel wool

Cleaning:
After EVERY USE, you should swab (clean the inside of) your head joint at the very least. If there is visible moisture inside of the body or foot joints, these should be swabbed as well. To swab your instrument, thread a corner of your rod cloth through the loop of the cleaning rod. Drape the rest of the cloth over the rod loop, and turn it around the rod to cover any exposed metal/plastic/wood (the exposed rod could scratch the inside of your instrument). Insert the rod/cloth assembly and gently turn to wipe moisture from the inside of the instrument.

After EVERY to EVERY FEW uses, you should wipe down the outside of your instrument with your rod cloth or a microfiber polishing cloth to remove any dirt or finger oils that may have gotten on the instrument while playing.

OCCASIONALLY, you may want to clean and sanitize the lip plate of your head joint. You can use rubbing alcohol or a mouthpiece cleaning spray with a soft cloth or paper towel for this.

AS NEEDED, you may want to polish the outside of the instrument with a dry treated silver polishing cloth to remove any tarnish that may have developed. This should only be done occasionally, as polish will remove a small layer of the silver plating. Take care not to get any residue on the pads. Only use a DRY cloth intended for this purpose – DO NOT attempt to use a liquid or cream silver polish intended for jewelry.

Tenons:
Tenons are the two joints where the parts of your instrument come together. If they become dirty or bent, it may be difficult to put the instrument together or the joints may become loose and wobbly. When assembling the instrument, take care to be sure that the joints will go straight together, and that you are not putting pressure on the tenon at an angle. If it becomes difficult to assemble your instrument, the tenons may be dirty. Clean them with your rod cloth or polishing cloth, or if they are especially bad, you can gently use fine steel wool to remove any residue. DO NOT attempt to lubricate the tenons with Vaseline or cork grease, as they are not intended to need it. Having a substance on the tenon will attract dirt and make the problem worse. Simply keeping the tenons clean should be sufficient to keep them working well.

Questions?
We hope this has been informative for our young flute players. If you have any other questions, we would be happy to answer them at Willis Music. Keep an eye out for “Care and Feeding of your Clarinet,” coming soon!

Who is this Adolphe Sax guy?

Ever wonder where the word Saxophone came from?  Me either, but here’s your answer.

From Wikipedia.

Antoine-Joseph “Adolphe” Sax (6 November 1814 – c. 7 February 1894) was a Belgian musical instrument designer and musician who played the flute and clarinet, and is well known for having invented the saxophone.

Early life
Adolphe Sax was born in Dinant, Belgium. His father, Charles-Joseph Sax, was an instrument designer himself, who made several changes to the design of the horn. Adolphe began to make his own instruments at an early age, entering two of his flutes and a clarinet into a competition at the age of 15. He subsequently studied those two instruments at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels.

Career
Having left the school, Sax began to experiment with new instrument designs, while his father continued to make conventional instruments to bring money into the household. Adolphe’s first important invention was an improvement of the bass clarinet design, which he patented at the age of 24. Sax relocated permanently to Paris in 1841 and began working on a new set of instruments exhibited there in 1844. These were valved bugles, and although he had not invented the instrument itself, his examples were so much more successful than those of his rivals that they became known as saxhorns. They range in approximately seven different sizes, and paved the path to the creation of the flugelhorn. Saxhorns are widely used today in concert bands and sometimes in orchestras. The saxhorn also laid the groundwork for the modern euphonium.

Sax also developed the saxotromba family, valved brass instruments with narrower bore than the saxhorns, in 1845, though they survived only briefly.[2]

Saxhorn instruments spread rapidly throughout the world. The saxhorn valves were accepted as state of the art and are largely unchanged today. The advances made by Adolphe Sax were soon followed by the British brass band movement which exclusively adopted the saxhorn range. The Jedforest Instrumental Band formed in 1854 and The Hawick Saxhorn Band formed in 1855, within the Scottish Borders, a decade after saxhorn models became available.

The period around 1840 saw Sax inventing the clarinette-bourdon, an early unsuccessful design of contrabass clarinet. He developed around this time the instrument for which he is now best known, the saxophone, patented on June 28, 1846. The saxophone was invented for use in both orchestras and concert bands. Composer Hector Berlioz wrote approvingly of the new instrument in 1842. By 1846 Sax had designed, on paper, a full range of saxophones (from sopranino to subcontrabass). Although they never became standard orchestral instruments, the saxophones made his reputation and secured him a job, teaching at the Paris Conservatoire in 1857.[3]

Sax continued to make instruments later in life and presided over a new saxophone class at the Paris Conservatoire. Rival instrument makers attacked the legitimacy of his patents and mounted a long campaign of litigation against Sax and his company. He was driven into bankruptcy in 1856 and again in 1873.

Sax suffered from lip cancer between 1853 and 1858 but made a full recovery. He died in 1894 in Paris and was interred in section 5 (Avenue de Montebello) at the Cimetière de Montmartre in Paris.

 

So that’s how the saxophone was invented and where the name came from.  Here at Moeller/Willis Music West Chester we have one of the best selections of saxes I’ve ever seen.  Come in and check them out today!

Melvin the “Mello” – phone….Do you name your instruments?

Melvin the Mello

Melvin the Mello

Came across this case in the store the other day.  A school had dropped off about a dozen mellophones for their yearly maintenance and there was a huge stack of them clogging the isles.  Obviously someone (name deleted for privacy reasons) had become so attached to this mellophone and spent so much time with it that they felt compelled to give it a name.  It reminded me of a middle school girl who came in the store once who was renting a viola.  I can’t remember the size but violas come in different sizes and as a child grows they have to upgrade occasionally to a bigger size.  This child’s teacher had decided that it was time for her to go to the next size up  The girl came in with her mother and was on the verge of tears because she was so attached to the viola which she had named, can’t remember the name unfortunately.  She refused to give it up.  She threw a virtual fit until her mother finally gave in and decided that despite the teacher’s wishes, she would let her daughter continue to rent the original viola.

 

Musicians can be strange birds sometimes.  We spend so much time with our instruments that we form a special “bond” with them, sometimes to the point of an unhealthy obsession with them.  We’d rather spend time with our special “someone” than humans.  This got me thinking about some of the famous examples of this out there.  Huge stars are no exception to this.  Below are some examples:

Yngwie Malmsteen’s “The Duck”

Yngwie's the Duck

Yngwie’s the Duck

 

 

 

 

Eddie Van Halen’s “FrankenStrat” or “Frankenstein”

Frankenstein

Frankenstein

 

 

 

 

Willie Nelson’s “Trigger”

Trigger

Trigger

 

 

 

 

and probably the most famous:

BB King’s “Lucille”

Lucille

Lucille

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you named your instrument?  Tell us about it either here or on one of our Facebook pages.  Need a new love of your life?  Come see us and pick out a new one.  Speed dating available daily!  Check out some of your fine choices here!

 

 

 

 

New Teachers in West Chester- Sign up Today!

We have several exciting new teachers at our West Chester Moeller/Willis Music location. These four new teachers are a great addition to our lessons!

Shelia Gardner- View Profile Here!

Voice lessons, Thursday Evenings 

Register for Lessons With Shelia Today!

 

 

Keith Lykins- View Profile Here

Acoustic, Electric, and Classical Guitar- Saturday, Sunday, & Monday

Register for Lessons With Keith Today!

 

Josiah Wolf- View Profile Here!

Drums- Thursdays 

Register for Lessons With Josiah Today!

 

Mike Haid- View Profile Here!

Drums- Sundays

Register for Lessons With Mike Today!

 

 

To see all of the teachers at our West Chester location, Click Here

Or Click Here to find a teacher near you!

 

Our Fantastic Teaching Staff

We tend to take them for granted and don’t talk about them enough so just wanted to take a second to introduce our fantastic teaching staff here at Moeller of Willis Music West Chester!

 

Check out their bios here! Or better yet,  just go ahead and sign up for lessons here!

 

We offer guitar, bass, drums, piano, keyboard, flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, coronet,  bass clarinet, violin, viola, mandolin, banjo, ukulele, and voice lessons and perhaps a few I forgot to mention.

Guitar “Hang” Saturday! 12:00 to 3:00 PM!

washburn_lyre-cadenza,v2-6-s-miner

While we can’t guarantee it’ll be as cool as the picture above, we’ll be having our guitar “HANG” this Saturday from 12:00 to 3:00 at our new digs in West Chester!  Come hang out, eat some pizza, have a soda, and talk guitars and maybe rub Metal Ted’s head.   Check out all the latest gear from Fender, Ibanez, Dean, Blackstar, Orange, Vox, Martin, Seagull and more!

First Fifty Customers Get Free Swag From D’Addario!

Moeller Music West Chester

7850 Cox Rd.

West Chester, Ohio 45069

513-777-7474

Now since you’re already on the internet go buy some guitars and amps here!

Drum Heaven at Moeller of Willis Music West Chester!

The new store is really starting to take shape here in West Chester!  If you’re a drummer and you haven’t stopped in yet please do.  We have a much larger selection than we ever have.  We have cymbals from Sabian, Zildjian, Meinl, Amedia, and Dream.  Featuring drum sets from Tama, Gretsch, Mapex, and Ddrum.  Electronic kits from Roland and Yamaha.  Percussion from LP, Toca, and Meinl.  Heads from Remo and Evans.  We have all your percussion needs covered.

Stop in and check it out and don’t forget about our “All About Drum Days” from Feb. 28 – March 2 and our Saturday “Scene” from 12:00 PM – 3:00 PM sponsored by Evans.  Free Swag to the first 50 customers from Evans Drum Heads.

Drum Heaven

Our new expanded drum department.

Cymbal Wall!

West Chester Cymbal Wall